ADVANCED PLACEMENT WORLD HISTORY: MODERN-COURSE SYLLABUS

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    Textbook:  Traditions & Encounters:  A Global Perspective on the Past-Sixth Edition

                          Jerry H. Bentley & Herbert F. Ziegler

     

    WHAT IS AP WORLD HISTORY MODERN?

    In AP World History: Modern, students investigate significant events, individuals, developments, and processes from 1200 to the present. Students develop and use the same skills, practices, and methods employed by historians: analyzing primary and secondary sources; developing historical arguments; making historical connections; and utilizing reasoning about comparison, causation, and continuity and change over time. The course provides six themes that students explore throughout the course in order to make connections among historical developments in different times and places: humans and the environment, cultural developments and interactions, governance, economic systems, social interactions and organization, and technology and innovation.

    A student’s performance on the AP World History: Modern exam (offered in May) determines a student’s eligibility to earn up to six hours of college credit. Course curriculum, materials, and expectations are designed to prepare students for the rigorous three-hour exam.

    COURSE PURPOSE: WHY TAKE THIS COURSE?

    AP World History is a superior preparation for college. While the goal is that you will all receive acceptable scores of threes or higher on the May exam for credit, additional goals include preparing students for 11th grade AP US History,  AP English Language and Composition, prepare for the rigors of the International Baccalaureate (IB) program, the PSAT and SAT college placement exams.  My wishes are that you learn to think critically and write as a good historian would. An additional desire is to open your eyes to the world.  The purpose of the course, however, extends beyond the possibility of earning college credit by providing students with the opportunity to develop skills and knowledge that will form a useful foundation for college studies.

    COURSE DESCRIPTION


    The class is broken down into manageable periods and the class will also focus on mastery of skills critical to the May AP World History exam. Students will address the higher level thinking skills or Habits of the Mind, and themes common to Advanced Placement Social Studies classes as well as the PSAT and SAT admissions tests.  Every part of the AP World History course assesses habits of mind as well as content. Students will take multiple-choice tests and write essays which will include studying maps, using graphs, analyzing art works, and interpreting quotations. Other aspects include assessing primary data, evaluations, arguments, handling diverse interpretations, making comparisons, and understanding historical context.

     

    AP HISTORICAL THINKING SKILLS

    • Developments and Processes
      • Identify a historical concept, development, or process
      • Explain a historical concept, development, or process
    •  Sourcing and Situation
      • Identify a source’s point of view, purpose, historical situation, and/or audience
      • Explain the point of view, purpose, historical situation, and/or audience of a source
      • Explain the significance of a source’s point of view, purpose, historical situation, and/or audience, including how these might limit the use(s) of a source
    •  Claims and Evidence in Sources
      • Identify and describe a claim and/or argument in a text-based or not-text-based source
      • Identify the evidence used in a source to support an argument
      • Compart the arguments or main ideas of two sources
      • Explain how claims or evidence support, modify, or refute a source’s argument
    •  Contextualization
      • Identify and describe a historical context for a specific historical development or process
      • Explain how a specific historical development or process is situated within a broader historical context
    • Making Connections
      • Identify patterns among or connections between historical developments and processes
      • Explain how a historical development or process relates to another historical development or process
    • Argumentation
      • Make a historically defensible claim
      • Support an argument using specific and relevant evidence
        • Describe specific examples of historically relevant evidence
        • Explain how specific examples of historically relevant evidence support an argument
      • Use historical reasoning to explain relationships among pieces of historical evidence
      • Corroborate, qualify, or modify an argument using diverse and alternative evidence in order to develop a complex argument.  This argument might:
        • Explain nuance of an issue by analyzing multiple variables
        • Explain relevant and insightful connections within and across periods
        • Explain the relative historical significance of  source’s credibility and limitations
        • Explain how or why a historical claim or argument is or is not effective

    THE SIX THEMES OF WORLD HISTORY

    THEME 1: HUMANS AND THE ENVIRONMENT (ENV)

    The environment shapes human societies, and as populations grow and change, these populations in turn shape their environments.

    THEME 2: CULTURAL DEVELOPMENTS AND INTERACTIONS (CDI)

    The development of ideas, beliefs, and religions illustrates how groups in society view themselves, and the interactions of societies and their beliefs often have political, social, and cultural implications.

    THEME 3: GOVERNANCE (GOV)

    A variety of internal and external factors contribute to state formation, expansion, and decline. Governments maintain order through a variety of administrative institutions, policies, and procedures, and governments obtain, retain, and exercise power in different ways and for different purposes.

    THEME 4: ECONOMIC SYSTEMS (ECN)

    As societies develop, they affect and are affected by the ways that they produce, exchange, and consume goods and services.

    THEME 5: SOCIAL INTERACTIONS AND ORGANIZATION (SIO)

    The process by which societies group their members and the norms that govern the interactions between these groups and between individuals influence political, economic, and cultural institutions and organization.

    THEME 6: TECHNOLOGY AND INNOVATION (TEC)

    Human adaptation and innovation have resulted in increased efficiency, comfort, and security, and technological advances have shaped human development and interactions with both intended and unintended consequences.

     

    AP EXAM INFORMATION

    The AP World History Exam is 3 hours and 15 minutes long and includes a 55-minute multiple-choice section, a 40-minute short answer section, a 60 minute document based essay question and a 40 minute long essay question.

     

     

     

     

     

Advanced Placement World History Course Syllabus