• Suicide Prevention Awareness

Suicide Prevention Hotline Logo
  • September is National Suicide Prevention Month.

    All month, mental health advocates, prevention organizations, survivors, allies, and community members unite to promote suicide prevention awareness.

    National Suicide Prevention Week(Sept. 6-13) is the Monday through Sunday surrounding World Suicide Prevention Day. It’s a time to share resources and stories, as well as promote suicide prevention awareness.

    World Suicide Prevention Day is September 10. It’s a time to remember those affected by suicide, to raise awareness, and to focus efforts on directing treatment to those who need it most.



  • How Can You Help?

    #BeThe1To

    #BeThe1To is the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline’s message for National Suicide Prevention Month and beyond, which helps spread the word about actions we can all take to prevent suicide. The Lifeline network and its partners are working to change the conversation from suicide to suicide prevention, to actions that can promote healing, help and give hope.

    • Ask: Research shows people who are having thoughts of suicide feel relief when someone asks after them in a caring way. Findings suggest acknowledging and talking about suicide may reduce rather than increase suicidal ideation.
    • Be There: Individuals are more likely to feel less depressed, less suicidal, less overwhelmed, and more hopeful by after speaking to someone who listens without judgment.
    • Keep Them Safe: A number of studies have indicated that when lethal means are made less available or less deadly, suicide rates by that method decline, and frequently suicide rates overall decline.
    • Help Them Stay Connected: Studies indicate that helping someone at risk create a network of resources and individuals for support and safety can help them take positive action and reduce feelings of hopelessness.
    • Follow Up: Studies have also shown that brief, low cost intervention and supportive, ongoing contact may be an important part of suicide prevention, especially for individuals after they have been discharged from hospitals or care services.

    Learn More: Get message kits, resources, events and more at the official website. (#BeThe1To.com)

Teen Dating Violence Awareness and Prevention

  • February is National Teen Dating Violence Awareness and Prevention Month (TDVAM).

    This is an issue that impacts everyone – not just teens – but their parents, teachers, friends and communities as well. Picture of teens holding hands

    Together, we can raise the  nation’s awareness about teen dating violence and promote safe, healthy relationships. 

    In his Teen Dating Violence Awareness & Prevention Month Proclamation President Obama called on all Americans “to stand against dating violence when we see it.” At a time when an estimated 1 in 10 teens will experience dating violence we all must take this opportunity to amplify our efforts and shine a spotlight on this important issue.

    What Is the Impact of Teen Dating Violence?

    Nationwide, youth age 12 to 19 experience the highest rates of rape and sexual assault. Studies show that approximately 10% of adolescents report being the victim of physical violence at the hands of an intimate partner during the previous year. Girls are particularly vulnerable to experiencing violence in their relationships and are more likely to suffer long-term behavioral and health consequences, including suicide attempts, eating disorders, and drug use.

    Adolescents in abusive relationships often carry these unhealthy patterns of violence into future relationships. Indeed, children who are victimized or witness violence frequently bring this experience with them to the playground, the classroom, later into teen relationships and, ultimately, they can end up the victims and perpetrators of adult intimate partner violence.

    Talk to Teens!

    Everyone can make a difference by reaching out to young people in simple ways. As we interact with teens in our work or personal lives each of us can act on President Obama’s call to stand against teen dating violence by:

    • Discussing the warning signs of dating abuse (all kinds, not just physical abuse).
    • Creating a positive connection to the issue – talk about the characteristics of healthy teen relationships, not just abusive ones – and use statistics sparingly.
    • Talking about how the media portrays healthy and unhealthy relationships. For example, many popular movies, TV shows, commercials, books, and magazines portray stalking as romantic or harmless when it is actually very dangerous.

    *The above information was taken from the Youth.Gov website and can be found here.

    Additional information and support resources can be found by visiting the links below: